Spiritual Essays #43

Who Am I?

Who Am I? The Question

There are some fundamental questions about your self-identity which are difficult to answer. The following are a few examples. Who am I? Am I what I think I am? Is there an identity in me that does not depend upon my thoughts, beliefs, and opinions? The other day, a well-known author, who is also a spiritual teacher, appeared in a television program and tried to answer the first question. His answer lacked conviction as he repeated standard answers from spiritual texts and seemed to be intent upon impressing his audience with his eloquence and beliefs rather than relating it to his own experience.

However, it was impressive that he was at least thinking about it. In today’s world how many people really think about it and of them how many do it without surrendering to their irrational and traditional beliefs? Most people are interested in the distractions of the world around them rather than what is in them. They confuse their beliefs for facts, facts for opinions, and opinions for truths, and speak with conviction the mysteries of life, when they should admit their limitations, and show humility to learn and find the truth. When you say, “I am soul,” you must know what a soul means and how you can incorporate it in your composite identity.

Indeed, there is no universal answer to the question of “Who am I?” You should be surprised if anyone answers it with confidence based upon his or her personal experience. Theoretically, you may know the answer, but personally it is difficult to come to terms with yourself without spending considerable time in contemplation and self-exploration. The answer must arise in you as an expression of your very being. It must define you and express you in your terms, free from your imagination, speculation, and beliefs.

Understanding the barriers to self-awareness

The following problems prevent you from knowing who you are. They are chiefly responsible for the difficulties you experience in knowing truths about yourself.

1. Your self-identity is an amorphous concept: You do not have one particular identity that remains constant. You have many identities at the same time and each of them may also undergo change. You play many roles, establish many relationships, and assume many identities as you deal with problems and try to survive in a world of numerous threats, challenges and conflicts.

2. You do not completely know yourself: Many things happen in you, without your knowledge and control. You have many aspects that remain unknown to you and to others until the end. Many assumptions that you make about them, such as your dream world, may not be true. You can study yourself from the outermost physical aspects of you to the innermost mental aspects and still you may not know for sure whether your study is complete.

3. You are conditioned to be: Your notion of Self is a construct or a formation conditioned by your need for approval and belongingness. It is an accumulation of knowledge, which does not truly represent you, but what you decide to project to the world as a part of your survival. You also wear many masks and embellish truths about you to hide certain aspects of you from the world to avoid their judgment, attention and disapproval.

4. Your identity constantly changes and evolves: Your identity as a child is not the same as your identity as an adult or an old person. You keep changing as you learn about you, others and the world, and as you progress in your life, leaving behind your attachments, identities, roles, responsibilities, and relationships. Since you are in a constant state of flux, you may appear differently to yourself and others in different contexts and time-frames.

5. You are a mental construct: You are an association of selected thoughts and memories, glued together by your desires and attachments. You create your identity or self-image as a construct, just as you create many things in your life according to your needs, desires, resources, and circumstances, and according to what you want to project to the world as you. The identity which you assume is the sum of sensations, beliefs, thoughts, ideas, opinions, memories, perceptions, feelings, emotions, experiences, concepts, desires, and attachments, which you dearly hold in your consciousness because they serve your self-interests. They create in you the notion of a personality or beingness, while a lot of what you experienced remains unrepresented and unaccounted for.

6. You create your own illusions: You not only create your self-identity with selective memories, but also embellish it with your imagination and creativity. You suppress and alter facts about your life, besides rewriting certain unpleasant memories, to present an ideal image of you to the world and to yourself. The Illusions you so create can hamper your ability to ascertain your true identity and understand your behavior.

7. You have many states of being and knowing: Are you the same person when you are awake, dreaming, or asleep, when you are angry, or when you are peaceful? As you interact with the external world, you experience different emotional states and appear differently to those who interact with you. Those states can also coexist at the same time. For example, you may internally be unhappy, but externally calm. You may be happy to see your friend, but may internally be feeling unhappy at the same time about an incident that happened a while ago. You inner world is thus a medley of diverse states in which it is difficult to know who you are and what you stand for. One school of thought suggests that externally you have an unstable and transient self, while internally, hidden behind it, is an eternal and unchanging self. While your external self may undergo innumerable changes, the inner one does not change since it is your eternal identity. Those who do not agree with this state that there is no eternal self beyond your impermanent self, and you must resolve its instability and transience to experience peace and stability.

Breaking the barriers

Your identity is an illusion or a projection because it does not reflect the truth of you but what you want to become in the esteem of others or what you want to project into the world as you. You are what you think and believe you are, not necessarily who you really are. This becomes evident when you consider the whole humanity and how they differ. All human beings go through many identical experiences in their lives, but end up feeling and being uniquely different because they pick specific memories from the pool of their experiences and choose to remember them in certain individual ways. They become what they choose to become and how they want to remember their past and make sense of it. The Buddha suggested long time ago that the so called self-image was but an aggregation of mental and physical parts, or a mental construct of selectively accumulated pieces of knowledge and information. It was pieced together by each being according to his or her desires, beliefs and preferences. It can be dispersed overtime with effort, just as you can breakdown any compound substance.

The identity you thus create is contextual and unstable. It is also incomplete because it selectively represents you based upon your choices. It is so fragile that it can be permanently lost if there is damage to the brain, or if there is a loss of memory as in case of Alzheimer’s patients. Since, it remains in a state of flux it does not give you a fixed sense of who you are except a limited view of who you might be.

Understanding yourself

Finding a definite answer to the question is not necessary because you can live without knowing it. Many people do not know an answer but still manage to live normally and achieve much of what they want to achieve. Still it is worthwhile to explore your consciousness and ascertain facts about the nature of your existence and identity. In your quest for self-knowledge, honesty is important. You should do it not to impress the world but to know who you are and what you are. Knowing it even vaguely elevates your thinking and your approach to the problems and people in your life. In this regard the following principles are worth mentioning.

1. Try to understand who you are even if you cannot exactly define who you are or why you exist.

2. Minimize the mental noise to know what exists when you are utterly silent.

3. Begin with what you know based upon your experience and observation, instead of indulging in speculation and imagination.

4. Understand the constructs you build and the masks you wear to manage the complexity of your life and relationships and how they may interfere with your true identity.

5. Observe yourself as you go through many emotional and physical states to know the observer and the one who experiences it.

6. Understand your illusions and conditioning to find your authentic self so that you can be yourself, true to yourself, and know yourself.

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Spiritual Teachings #10 Jewish

Spiritual Teaching from the Jewish Tradition

“Do not exalt any path above God. There are many paths that lead to God.

So people are capable of finding and following the ways that suit them,

provided they do not stand still.”    Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

A Vessel without Light Breaks

A parable is a vessel for the message within it. So too, the word is the vessel for the expression of thought. And if one speaks without Kavanah, it is the very enactment of the “Breaking of the Vessels” (1), for in such a case, there is no inner life to the words. But when one divests oneself of materiality, which is the person’s body and “vessel”, one is able to behold the inner nature of the vessel, the life and light of the letters.(2) When one is divested of corporeality and is enclothed in one’s words, one is in a state of D’vequt. Take care not to lose the concentrated stream of awareness and fortify yourself on high.

________________

(1) The cosmic rupture at the beginning of the process of creation that enabled duality and evil to manifest in creation, for the sake of providing humanity with free choice; as a means toward the individual growth of awareness and integration with the Primordial Tiqqun. But whereas the original “breaking of the vessels” occurred as an act of Divine Will for the reason just mentioned, this breaking, due to the seperation of one’s intent from one’s words, serves only a destructive purpose. It is interesting to note that whereas in the Creation process, the vessels broke due to a superabundance of light, here, they shatter due to too-little light. This is no doubt because the provision of light that cannot be integrated also leaves the vessel empty and unsustained.

(2) This subtle teaching contrasts the the divestment of intent [which is like the “light”] from words [which are like “the vessels” – and as a result of the seperation of light from vessel, the vessel falls and breaks – as in the Zoharic-Lurianic formulation]; with the divestment of one’s awareness [which is again, the light] from the body, which is here described as the outer manifestation of the inner nature of the vessel. But here, in contrast with the Creation from Nothing, rather than causing the breaking of the vessel, one discovers the true essence of the vessel – the divinely communicated outer world of information that enables the stability of the outer world – in a dispassionate way.

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Rosicrucian Reflections #87

“To be whole and free is to live and manifest on the material and immaterial planes in harmony with the spiritual laws that govern all that there is. It then becomes our duty and responsibility to transmit and reflect in our daily lives, and to our utmost ability, the highest vibrations of the universe and of our Creator.”

– Dr. Lonnie Edwards

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Essene Meditations And Blessings #88

Meditation

As the wave of summer’s glory

Reaches crest

And then flows on,

I gain perspective

Of my doing-nature.

A half-turn of the wheel ago

Saw me emerging from winter,

With visions, plans, and dreams.

Where have the visions led me,

What plans have been realized?

What of my life? I ask.

What of today?

The Blessing

In this season of outer work,

My twofold task is clear.

My work is learning

And also teaching,

For I have much to share.

No false humility

Will block the rhythm of this cycle,

This flow of wisdom

To me, through me.

The inbreath-outbreath finds me

Now learning, now teaching;

The cycle is complete.

-Danaan Parry

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Weekly Meditation #86

Sorrow Flees From Me

As the great joy of life comes into my soul, flooding me with its wondrous light, all sorrow and sadness flee from me. I do not grieve, for nothing is lost or gone from me. My own cannot be kept from me. My own knows me and follows me wherever I go. I am filled with the joy of living and the great peace that comes to all who believe, I am made glad forevermore.

-Ernest Holmes

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Buddha’s Quotes #38

“On a long journey of human life, faith is the best of companions; it is the best refreshment on the journey; and it is the greatest property. We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves.”

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Science Of Mind #58

I Keep My Thought Clear

We are surrounded by a receptive and creative medium that receives our thought and acts upon it. there is nothing harder than keeping the thought straight, and nothing else so desirable. It is not easy in our contacts with the daily world to keep our thoughts so clear that we never become unpoised, that we never accept anything we do not wish to accept, and that we always control the intellect so the emotions do not respond unless the intellect says to respond. But whenever we can do this, our destiny will be in our own hands, backed by an immutable Power. But before we do this, we must relate and harmonize ourselves with the Infinite. We oppose It when we admit that anything opposes us. We deny it when we admit that good is denied to us.

When we find ourselves in discordant conditions, we should never say, “Oh, what’s the use?” Rather, we should say, “There is Something in me that is greater than this condition and It can dissolve it.” We have the privilege and power to do this, and if we use this ability properly, it will produce wonderful results. Remember that the cause of everything is and idea and that the thought is the mold in which our tangible experience is cast.

I have the power to live the life of good. my thought reflects the good that I desire. I am conscious of the focus of my thinking, and my own is manifesting itself to me now. There is nothing kin me that can hinder it from entering and taking possession of my Soul. M y own is now expressed.

-Ernest Holmes

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Spiritual Essays #42

The Mind and The Illusion of Reality

by Jayaram V

Mental peace, gentleness, silence, self-control, purity of thoughts and feelings, this is said to be the austerity of the mind. Bhagavadgita 17:16.

If your mind is empty, it is always ready for anything, it is open to everything. In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s mind there are few. Shunryu Suzuki.


Imagine you are walking in a garden with your friend and you both stand before an old tree and silently observe its beauty and majesty. At the moment, do you think you both are perceiving the same tree? Are you sure that you both focused on the same details and constructed the same image of it in your minds? Do you know that the one tree becomes a million trees in the minds of a million people who watch it? The one world becomes as many in as many minds as there are people on earth. You, the one person, become many in the minds of all the people you know. Each of them may perceive you differently and understand you differently.

The non-dualistic school of Vedanta (Advaita) stretches this analogy all the way back to Brahman, the Universal Self, and regards Him as the one, ultimate, true, and only source of all projections, reflections, and illusions that manifest in existence. At individual level, each of us is a creator. Each person, like Brahman, becomes many in different inner worlds of different people. Such diversity results in multiple realities concerning each of us which are difficult to resolve into an integral and harmonious whole. This is the illusion of existence in an ever-changing world, which we often cling to as real with unhappy consequences. In all the images and appearances in which you create yourself in numerous minds, it is difficult to discover the real you. In your own mind, you experience different moods, emotions, and states of consciousness, and in each of them, you outwardly become a different person, which makes it rationally difficult for anyone who knows you to establish your true identity. Yet, we somehow believe that we can judge people and things, and draw rational conclusions about them.

Such illusions and differences in perception arise because of the way the mind works. Our minds make us blind to our own faults and to certain truths of our existence to create the illusion of security and continuity. Stella (name changed) is a script editor in a publishing company. Her duty is to edit the books her boss short lists for publishing and ensure that the manuscripts are thoroughly checked for all possible spelling and grammatical mistakes before they are passed on to others in the line. Stella says that she had gone through hundreds of manuscripts, and her observation is that self-publishers will have a hard time editing their own works, because their minds blind them to their own faults. According to her, even if you carefully go through your manuscript several times, you will most likely miss to notice some obvious errors.

Behavioral scientists are aware of this shortcoming of the human mind. They know that your mind does not let you see everything clearly even if you pay enough attention. It fills in the blanks and makes up many things to give you the illusion of reality that would strengthen your beliefs, thinking and attitude. Your mind builds many illusions and keeps reinforcing them to save you time and effort. They help you manage simple and routine tasks and provide you with quick solutions to the challenges that you face in a complex world. It is why changing the perceptions of people, their choices, preferences, beliefs, and behavior is so difficult. How can you change people when they feel secure and comfortable with their mental constructs that may not necessarily correspond to the reality outside?

Understanding reality of illusion and the illusion of reality

There are two aspects to any reality that you experience. One is objective reality that comes from outside through your senses, and the other is a subjective reality that arises in you as its reflection in your consciousness. In between the two is your mind, like a lens with its own impurities and parallax error. Your subjective reality is the distilled reality. It is a construct of your mind, which does not fully correspond to the reality outside. It is a distorted version of the objective reality, distorted to the extent you are distracted by the modifications of your mind.

This is a problem with which seers and philosophers have grappled since ancient times. They noticed that the reality of things became distorted in the human mind to the extent the mind was drawn into external world and was attached to the things or repelled by them. The distractions and modifications of the mind that were caused by external and internal factors put people under a kind of spell and prevented them from seeing the truths of their existence and their essential nature. In extreme cases, when the difference between objective and subjective realities became too distant, people became delusional and mentally abnormal. We know that under the influence of drugs, alcohol, and intoxicants, people tend to become temporarily delusional and lose touch with the reality. Sometimes the gap between the two can grow wider and result in hallucinations and abnormal behavior. In ancient times when people completely lost touch with outside reality and acted as if they were different people, they were considered to be possessed by good or bad spirits.

The problem of understanding reality also gripped the minds of several European scholars such as Kant, and Schopenhauer. Kant argued that the objective reality that humans experienced was an illusion because the human mind used its known models and molds to make sense of it. Schopenhauer accepted the argument of Kent, but believed that even though the mind was subject to illusion, things were still knowable through direct experience, internal perception, or intuition. Schopenhauer read the Upanishads and was aware of the Vedanta philosophy. It is possible that he arrived at his conclusions based upon his study of them. The Yoga Sutras (4.16-17) declares that the objective reality is independent of the subjective reality. It exists whether you perceive it or not. Otherwise, what will happen to the objects that no one perceives? Things are perceptible to the senses from direct experience, but they are truly knowable only when the mind is still and free from modifications, and the seer is in complete harmony with them.

It is true that the mind stands between you and the reality. For example, the way you perceive reality is very different from the way a dog perceives it. Dogs have infrared vision and can listen from far to subtle sounds, whereas human do not have those abilities. On the other hand, humans can see millions of colors, which dogs cannot see. Therefore, the world which the dogs perceive is very dissimilar to the ones that humans perceive. Such differences exist not only between species but also with in each species and groups of individuals. Some are keen observers, some are good listeners, and some are good in grasping others’ feelings and empathizing with them. Such abilities may also change and evolve with time as civilization progresses. For example, the world which we perceive today is very dissimilar to the world our ancestors perceived because we have a different understanding of the things now.

What this means is that if the human brain evolves in future or develops newer abilities and senses, it may probably see the world in an entirely different light. In this sense, the world is a Maya, or an illusion. Your perception of the world may not be the same as that of your friend. You may both live in the same city. You may like it, but your friend may not. Such differences in preferences and perceptions arise because the human mind, acts like a sieve. It filters your perceptions according to your knowledge, likes and dislikes, habits, and beliefs. Therefore, truly, your reality is an illusion of your mind. It is your mental construct, which you use to add meaning and structure to your life and identity. Thus, the illusion of reality becomes the reality in the human mind, while the reality that originally induced it remains completely or mostly unknown.

Impediments to truth

The seers of Hinduism speculated about the nature of reality and human consciousness, and identified several factors that interfered with our ability to perceive truth. They called them impurities (malas) or obstacles to knowledge and freedom, since they fettered the mind with attachments (pasas) and led to the delusion (maya) of mistaking the untrue for true, and truth for falsehood. According to the scriptures of Hinduism, the following factors are largely responsible for the distortions in our perception and comprehension.

1. Modes of natureĀ (gunas), namely sattva, rajas and tamas, which induced people to act righteously, selfishly, and egoistically.

2. Attraction (raga) and aversion (dvesha) to the pairs of opposites (dvanda) such as heat and cold, or pain and pleasure.

3. Egoism (anava) which strengthens our individuality and makes each individual perceive the world and others as distinct and separate from himself.

4. Desires (kama), which cloud the mind and lead to attachment.

5. Lack of knowledge (avidya), or ignorance, which prevents one from seeing the truth that is hidden in things.

All schools of Hinduism recognize delusion as the natural state of mind. Human beings are endowed with intelligence (buddhi) and the power of discernment (vivekam), but they are enveloped by the darkness of several imperfections and weaknesses. They increase to the extent you are drawn outwardly, and become involved with the world. If you want to see the reality as it is, you must mentally withdraw from the field of observation and become a passive observer. Your mind has to become still and utterly clam, without any modifications, as you become indifferent to the events that happen around you, so that you can see the world without distortions and distractions. A person who develops such a unified and undisturbed vision is called a seer (rishi). A seer is one who can penetrate into the nature of things and understand them from inside out. He does not go by the illusion of appearances but by the substance or the truth that is hidden in them. He does not cling to the objects he sees, but lets them present themselves to him in their natural (prakritic) and purest (sattivic) state. The purest state of an object, as our scriptures describe, is the original state that Brahman, the Creator, intended it to be, not what you made out of it. An object remains pure in your perception and memory if you do not superimpose your constructs upon it.

Developing an all-round vision

According to our Puranas, in the beginning no one had the all-round vision of things, except Brahma, the Creator god. When he manifested from the waters of life from the Cosmic Egg, he was endowed with four heads which looked in four directions and made him omniscient. Other gods were not comfortable with his superior position and supreme power. Therefore, they contrived to cut off one of his heads and limited his ability to know things. In the Hindu pantheon, the status of each deity depends upon his or her ability to know. The highest of all is Brahman, the knower of all. In the body of an individual it is the Self. The ability of other deities to know and grasp, who are personified in the beings as the senses and organs, becomes limited according to their position and status in the cosmic hierarchy.

How can you develop such a vision? In both Hinduism and Buddhism you will find specific methods with which you can purify your mind and body, and see things clearly. The methods help you free your mind from its usual illusions and attachments, so that you can learn to clearly see the truth that is hidden behind the illusory surface and become established in it. With effort, any yogi can cultivate a pure, passionless, and stable mind, and become a seer, or a true observer. A seer has not only a clear vision that can penetrate and see beyond the surface truths, but also a silent and vigilant mind that sustains his concentration and mental toughness. Hence, he is also known as the silent one (muni), and the stable one (dhira), whose mind is silent and withdrawn, but insightfully awake and attentive. As he transcends the natural limitations of the mind, he develops the ability to perceive things without effort and easily enter the essence of things without being influenced by them.

Have you ever stood in the presence of a true spiritual master. Even if he is in a crowd of a thousand people, he can instantly focus upon a particular individual and instantly gain insight into his thoughts. Sometimes, by a mere glance he can identify a troubled person and give him a blessing. He is able to do it because he has without egoism, desires, and expectations. When he has none of this, he can easily empathize with others and feel their feelings and thoughts. It is said that in ancient India the seers who lived in the densest forests were able to use the same awareness to establish rapport with the wild animals that roamed around them and live in harmony with them.

Bondage in Hinduism means having desires and attachments. They hold you down to things and people. Each relationship that you build in this world becomes a fetter that keeps you in chains. True freedom (nirvana) is freedom from desires, and expectations. It is the extinguishing or burning away of all the bonds and shackles that your mind builds in you and holds you in chains. The scriptures say that the human birth is a great opportunity to free your mind from desires and escape from the problem of mortality and suffering. With their intelligence, human beings alone can train their minds to see things as they are and break free from the illusions to which they are subject. The following are a few well-known practices that can lead to freedom from illusions.

1. Eating right food: The Bhagavadgita suggests that eating the right type of food or sattvic food leads to physical and mental clarity It describes the sattvic food as that which increases lifespan, purity, strength, health, happiness, (and) satisfaction, which is tasty, oily, firm, (and) agreeable.

2. Practicing virtue: Virtue should be practiced by observing rules (cleanliness, contentment, austerity, study of scriptures, and devotion), and practicing restraints (nonviolence, truthfulness, non-stealing, celibacy, and non-covetousness). In Buddhism the same is aimed by the Eightfold Path (Right view, Right intention, Right speech Right action, Right livelihood, Right effort, Right mindfulness, and Right concentration).

3. Restraint of the senses: It is also referred to as withdrawal of the senses. You have better control over your senses when you have detachment, dispassion, and sameness towards all. You can cultivate them by overcoming desires and clinging, living without expectations, and cultivating indifference to the pairs of opposites.

4. Restraining the mind: By nature, the human mind is fickle and unstable. It can be restrained, stabilized and balanced by the above mentioned three practices, along with meditation, concentration, introspection, devotion, and mindful observation.

Cultivating a pure mind that sees things objectively, thinks rationally, and remains undisturbed in an ever-changing world is vital to our physical, mental and spiritual wellbeing. Whether you are an atheistic or a theist, whether you practice any particular religion or a composite religion of your own, having a stable mind that can see things as they are is greatly helpful in our fast paced world to deal with your problems and keep your sanity. You mind constructs your reality. We should always remember this truth. If you can keep your mind empty, free from judgment, open, unassuming, you let truth enter without modifications and distortions.

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Spiritual Teachings #9 Rishi-Sufi

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The Pain of the lover for the Beloved

     The Sufi’s deep longing for union became a poetic ‘pain’. Pain is the longing of the ‘lover’ to rejoin the ‘Beloved’. Pain represents the friction and struggle that comes from having to live in this transient world with an ageing body, all the while longing for union with one’s own vast God-consciousness which transcends the trivialities of this world. Uncertainty and insecurity of every arising moment and day, not knowing how the mind will unfold in its search of the path is also the source of this pain. This is a pain without a cure. The Sufi would rather die than live without the pain of that longing for union. It is a joyful pain, the pain of being alive, the pain of being in love with, but separated from, the Beloved.

The Beloved is indeed the goal, the lover is the veil,

The Beloved is indeed immortal, the lover’s life must fail. – Rumi

There is no hindrance between the Beloved and the lover,

You are yourself the veil in-between; remove the cover. – Hafiz

O Lord

My painful nagging is that your pain will not fade.

He who bears the pain of the Friend would become immortal

in the love and grace of His Fellowship. – Ansari

I have fallen in an ocean and I see no shore.

I am afflicted with a pain that has no cure. – Attar

I have inherited a pain from the Friend,

Which I will not exchange for a hundred thousand cures.

– Rumi

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis

Rosicrucian Reflections #86

“The Rosicrucian realizes that at any moment, at any time of day, we can turn our thoughts inward and immediately contact the mind and consciousness of God. We realize that we do not have to be in a church to pray. We realize that we can talk with God on a hilltop, under a tree, in a canoe, in an automobile, in the cellar of our house, in the garret, or in the corner of our bedroom. God is not reached by turning our thoughts outward to some point in the heavens but by turning our thoughts inward to the temple within where the consciousness of God is always ready to respond and give help.”

-Dr. H. Spencer Lewis

*****

May God bless and protect you and…

May you always be

Healthy, Happy

Safe and Comfortable

Seth Kelly Curtis